Day 227: Three-Wattled Bellbird
A migratory bird of Central America, the Three-Wattled Bellbird is known for it’s strange call, especially in Panama, as in Nicaragua, it has a far more noisy call.  In old illustrations and taxidermy specimens, the wattles have been shown sticking out, but in reality, have no musculature structure to achieve this look.  An example of their call can be heard here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gnu8QbpImWw

Day 227: Three-Wattled Bellbird

A migratory bird of Central America, the Three-Wattled Bellbird is known for it’s strange call, especially in Panama, as in Nicaragua, it has a far more noisy call.  In old illustrations and taxidermy specimens, the wattles have been shown sticking out, but in reality, have no musculature structure to achieve this look.  An example of their call can be heard here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gnu8QbpImWw

Day 225: Bobolink
The only member of the genus Dolichonyx, the Bobolink is known as the rice or reedbird in the southern US where it feeds on mass amounts of grain and rice through the Gulf.  Emily Dickinson mentioned the Bobolink in many of her poems, possibly because of her fondness for it’s bubbly song.

Day 225: Bobolink

The only member of the genus Dolichonyx, the Bobolink is known as the rice or reedbird in the southern US where it feeds on mass amounts of grain and rice through the Gulf.  Emily Dickinson mentioned the Bobolink in many of her poems, possibly because of her fondness for it’s bubbly song.

Day 223: Purple Swamphen
Also known as the Sultana Bird, the Purple Swamphen lives throughout the world and is thought to be the ancestor of many island species.  Having made their home in New Zealand, the Maori give an explanation to their swamp habitat as being a punishment for not wanting to come down to help eat bugs, though Kiwi did this task and thus lost his ability to fly.

Day 223: Purple Swamphen

Also known as the Sultana Bird, the Purple Swamphen lives throughout the world and is thought to be the ancestor of many island species.  Having made their home in New Zealand, the Maori give an explanation to their swamp habitat as being a punishment for not wanting to come down to help eat bugs, though Kiwi did this task and thus lost his ability to fly.