Day 202: Egyptian Vulture 
An endangered Old World vulture found from India into Europe and Northern Africa, the Egyptian Vulture is featured in Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics as the vowel sound of A.  Populations that live in temperate regions, migrate south for winter, while most other populations remain sedentary.  
They are carrion eaters, but because of their habit of ingesting the faeces of mammals, they were despised by British colonists in India. Despite this, they were a symbol of royalty to the Egyptian Pharaohs, and became so common in Egypt that they were known as the pharaoh’s chickens.

Day 202: Egyptian Vulture 

An endangered Old World vulture found from India into Europe and Northern Africa, the Egyptian Vulture is featured in Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics as the vowel sound of A.  Populations that live in temperate regions, migrate south for winter, while most other populations remain sedentary.  

They are carrion eaters, but because of their habit of ingesting the faeces of mammals, they were despised by British colonists in India. Despite this, they were a symbol of royalty to the Egyptian Pharaohs, and became so common in Egypt that they were known as the pharaoh’s chickens.

Day 198: Island Scrub Jay
Endemic to Santa Cruz Island, the Island Scrub Jay is the only insular endemic landbird in North America. As a corvid, this bird has taken a hard hit from the West Nile Virus that has come to the area since 2003.  The increase in wildfires and introduced ungulate species has also threatened an already small population.

Day 198: Island Scrub Jay

Endemic to Santa Cruz Island, the Island Scrub Jay is the only insular endemic landbird in North America. As a corvid, this bird has taken a hard hit from the West Nile Virus that has come to the area since 2003.  The increase in wildfires and introduced ungulate species has also threatened an already small population.

Day 197: Burrowing Owl
Found in the grasslands and deserts of North and South America, the Burrowing Owl is active during the day unlike other owl species.  They use prairie dog burrows for their roosts and their long legs to sprint along the land in addition to flight. Their populations are threatened by habitat loss and the declining population of prairie dogs.

Day 197: Burrowing Owl

Found in the grasslands and deserts of North and South America, the Burrowing Owl is active during the day unlike other owl species.  They use prairie dog burrows for their roosts and their long legs to sprint along the land in addition to flight. Their populations are threatened by habitat loss and the declining population of prairie dogs.

Day 196: Oilbird
Also known as the Guácharo, the Oilbird is a nocturnal bird of northern South America, feeding on the fruits of oil palm and take the title of the only flying fruit-eating bird.  Living in caves, they use echolocation similar to bats, but their high-pitched clicks can be heard by humans.

Day 196: Oilbird

Also known as the Guácharo, the Oilbird is a nocturnal bird of northern South America, feeding on the fruits of oil palm and take the title of the only flying fruit-eating bird.  Living in caves, they use echolocation similar to bats, but their high-pitched clicks can be heard by humans.

Day 194: Black Heron
An African heron found anywhere south of the Sahara Desert, the Black Heron is well known for it’s hunting technique known as canopy feeding. By covering their head, they create shade that attracts fish, while also feeding on insects and amphibians.

Day 194: Black Heron

An African heron found anywhere south of the Sahara Desert, the Black Heron is well known for it’s hunting technique known as canopy feeding. By covering their head, they create shade that attracts fish, while also feeding on insects and amphibians.

Day 193: Huia
An extinct New Zealand wattlebird of the North Island, the Huia was hunted for mounted collections, for fashionable hats, and lost much of their primary forest habitat with European settlers deforestation.  Most records point to these birds taking on monogamous relationships so deeply formed, that the female was said to die 10 days after the male perished.
Their feathers were prized by the Maori, and because of their bold nature, were easy to capture and keep as pets where they could sometimes be trained to say a few words.

Day 193: Huia

An extinct New Zealand wattlebird of the North Island, the Huia was hunted for mounted collections, for fashionable hats, and lost much of their primary forest habitat with European settlers deforestation.  Most records point to these birds taking on monogamous relationships so deeply formed, that the female was said to die 10 days after the male perished.

Their feathers were prized by the Maori, and because of their bold nature, were easy to capture and keep as pets where they could sometimes be trained to say a few words.